Summer Pre-College Course Descriptions

Our summer program is open to rising high school seniors, qualified juniors, and recent high school graduates as well as current college students. All courses are taught by Sarah Lawrence faculty—ranked #1 in the country in 2013 by The Princeton Review. All classes are offered with the option to stay on campus or commute.

Web Programming

July 7 – July 30, 2014
Mondays and Wednesdays
1 – 4:45 p.m. (once per week, class will be extended for conferencing)
3 credits
Tuition: $3,573

This course is a rigorous introduction to the fundamental principles of computer science and their application to the design and implementation of interactive Web sites. We will learn computer programming from the ground up and demonstrate how it can be used as a general problem-solving tool. Throughout the course, we will emphasize the power of abstraction and the benefits of clearly written, well-structured code. We will consider several programming languages, though our focus will be on JavaScript on the client (browser) side and PHP on the server side. (Time permitting, we will also consider Node.js.) We will discuss the benefits of code reuse through libraries such as jQuery and automatic code generation through frameworks such as Backbone. We will cover aspects of procedural, object-oriented, and functional programming. Examples of Web applications we will implement include a blogging program, a virtual art gallery, and an arcade-style game. 

No prior experience with programming or Web design is necessary, but students will be expected to work at a fast pace. 

Michael Siff (BA, BSE, MSE, University of Pennsylvania; PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison) specializes in programming languages, cryptology, computational number theory, and computer science education. He is also the author of several research papers on the interplay between logic, type theory, software engineering, and how the former can be leveraged to identify reusable object-oriented components in legacy C code. His current research focuses on the intersection between technology, art and society, and the role of video games in the classroom. 

How to apply»



Elementary Arabic I

June 2 – June 26
Monday – Thursday
Classroom Instruction: 9:30 a.m. – noon
Discussion Section: 1:00 – 1:45 p.m.
4 credits
Tuition: $4,764

Arabic is the official language of over 20 countries throughout the Middle East and North Africa. This course starts with the Arabic alphabet. Students learn to pronounce the sounds of Arabic and write its letters (in about 20 class hours) and then move on to build basic skills in Modern Standard Arabic, the language read, written, and understood by educated Arabs and media everywhere in the Arab world. No prior experience in Arabic is necessary. The course will aim at developing all four skills of reading, writing, speaking, and understanding. The textbooks and their corresponding multimedia will introduce the student to social and cultural aspects of Arab and Islamic society connected to everyday life. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to initiate, respond to, and maintain simple conversation about themselves, their family, and their field of study; read simple passages, and write simple compositions on familiar topics.

How to apply»


Elementary Arabic II

July 7 – August 1
Monday – Thursday
Classroom Instruction: 9:30 a.m. – noon
Discussion Section: 1:00 – 1:45 p.m.
4 credits
Tuition: $4,764

How to apply»


Masterworks of Fiction

July 7 – July 30, 2014
Tuesday and Thursday
1:00 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
(once per week, class will be extended for conferencing)
Instructor: Ilja Wachs
3 credits
Tuition: $3,573

In this course we will perform very close readings of nineteenth and twentieth century fictional texts. Readings will be chosen from among such writers as Austen, Dickens, Dostoyevsky, Marquez, D.H. Lawrence, and Joyce.  This is a reading and discussion course. A number of short papers will be required.  The emphasis will be upon the visions of life embodied in these works and the formal designs by which these visions are communicated.

Ilja Wachs has been a member of the literature faculty at Sarah Lawrence College since 1965. From 1980-85, he served as the Dean of the College, and holds the Wachs Chair for Excellence in Teaching and Donning. He is the author of Dickens: The Orphan Condition (1999), and specializes in works of the 19th century, with an emphasis on the relation between the individual and the social world.

How to apply»


How to Apply

To apply, please download an application, complete it, and return via mail, e-mail, or fax to:

The Center for Continuing Education & Special Programs
Sarah Lawrence College
1 Mead Way
Bronxville, NY 10708
Fax: (914) 395-2608
specialprograms@sarahlawrence.edu

If you have any questions or would like more information, please e-mail specialprograms@sarahlawrence.edu or call (914) 395-2205.