SLC.edu / Continuing Education and Special Programs / Summer Programs / Summer Pre-College Course Descriptions

Summer Pre-College Course Descriptions

The following credit classes are open to rising high school seniors, qualified juniors, and recent high school graduates as well as current college students. All courses are taught by Sarah Lawrence faculty—ranked #1 in the country in 2013 by The Princeton Review. All classes are offered with the option to stay on campus or commute.

Web Programming

July 7 – July 30, 2014
Mondays and Wednesdays
1 – 4:45 p.m. (once per week, class will be extended for conferencing)
3 credits
Tuition: $3,573

This course is a rigorous introduction to the fundamental principles of computer science and their application to the design and implementation of interactive Web sites. We will learn computer programming from the ground up and demonstrate how it can be used as a general problem-solving tool. Throughout the course, we will emphasize the power of abstraction and the benefits of clearly written, well-structured code. We will consider several programming languages, though our focus will be on JavaScript on the client (browser) side and PHP on the server side. (Time permitting, we will also consider Node.js.) We will discuss the benefits of code reuse through libraries such as jQuery and automatic code generation through frameworks such as Backbone. We will cover aspects of procedural, object-oriented, and functional programming. Examples of Web applications we will implement include a blogging program, a virtual art gallery, and an arcade-style game. 

No prior experience with programming or Web design is necessary, but students will be expected to work at a fast pace. 

Michael Siff (BA, BSE, MSE, University of Pennsylvania; PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison) specializes in programming languages, cryptology, computational number theory, and computer science education. He is also the author of several research papers on the interplay between logic, type theory, software engineering, and how the former can be leveraged to identify reusable object-oriented components in legacy C code. His current research focuses on the intersection between technology, art and society, and the role of video games in the classroom. 

How to apply»


Rapid Game Lab

July 8 – July 31, 2014
Tuesdays and Thursdays  
1 – 4:45 p.m.
(once per week, class will be extended for conferencing)
3 credits
Tuition: $3,573

Do you like playing casual games and wonder how they are made? This course leads students through the production of a small Web game from start to finish with no prior programming knowledge required. You’ll learn small game design and development along with the basics of Processing, a free and open source graphics programming environment that can be used on Windows or Mac computers. You’ll begin by prototyping some of the design concepts behind small games, then move on to programming graphics, motion, timers, and effects. Finally, you’ll learn how to add sound and music. Skills are taught step by step in an arts-friendly environment.

How to apply»


Urban Ecology: Environmental Challenges and Solutions

July 7 – August 1
Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays
9:00 – 11:30 a.m.
(once per week, class will be extended for conferencing)
3 credits
Tuition: $3,573

Surrounded by ecological and cultural diversity, the Hudson Valley is one of the most beautiful and inspirational regions of our country. Residents have unparalleled opportunities to explore complex, delicate natural areas, to participate in work that will transform our future, and to tap into New York City’s population of 8 million consumers. Yet this confrontation of natural habitats with the urban jungle is at the heart of nearly all of our most pressing environmental issues, which threaten vital resources – food, water, shelter, and health. Nonetheless, it is from these urban/natural boundaries that the solutions will be derived. In this course, you will learn about the natural history of this influential region, environmental threats to its health and prosperity, and solutions to meet these challenges – including the emerging fields of environmental justice, habitat restoration, urban gardening, and green stormwater management. 

This course will meet at the Center for the Urban River at Beczak at the waterfront in downtown Yonkers, where at least a portion of each day will involve outside fieldwork. The class also includes a trip to New York City to see firsthand how some of these solutions can contribute to maintaining a sustainable, vibrant city. 

For more information about the Center for the Urban River at Beczak visit www.centerfortheurbanriver.org.

Kali C. Bird (BS, Oklahoma Baptist University; MS, Michigan State University) specializes in community outreach and improving land management in the face of habitat and biodiversity loss, species invasions, climate change, health threats, and increasing usage of environmental toxins. Her background includes conducting aquatic microbial ecology research, managing land, and inquiry-based teaching. She has taught students of all ages in multiple countries, from Russian schoolchildren to Marist College students to teachers from all over New York and surrounding states. She has also contributed her skills as an environmental professional with local nonprofit organizations, such as the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference and Scenic Hudson.

How to apply»


Elementary Arabic I

June 2 – June 26
Monday – Thursday
Classroom Instruction: 9:30 a.m. – noon
Discussion Section: 1:00 – 1:45 p.m.
4 credits
Tuition: $4,764

Arabic is the official language of over 20 countries throughout the Middle East and North Africa. This course starts with the Arabic alphabet. Students learn to pronounce the sounds of Arabic and write its letters (in about 20 class hours) and then move on to build basic skills in Modern Standard Arabic, the language read, written, and understood by educated Arabs and media everywhere in the Arab world. No prior experience in Arabic is necessary. The course will aim at developing all four skills of reading, writing, speaking, and understanding. The textbooks and their corresponding multimedia will introduce the student to social and cultural aspects of Arab and Islamic society connected to everyday life. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to initiate, respond to, and maintain simple conversation about themselves, their family, and their field of study; read simple passages, and write simple compositions on familiar topics.

How to apply»


Elementary Arabic II

July 7 – August 1
Monday – Thursday
Classroom Instruction: 9:30 a.m. – noon
Discussion Section: 1:00 – 1:45 p.m.
4 credits
Tuition: $4,764

How to apply»


Masterworks of Fiction

July 7 – July 30, 2014
Tuesday and Thursday
1:00 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
(once per week, class will be extended for conferencing)
Instructor: Ilja Wachs
3 credits
Tuition: $3,573

In this course we will perform very close readings of nineteenth and twentieth century fictional texts. Readings will be chosen from among such writers as Austen, Dickens, Dostoyevsky, Marquez, D.H. Lawrence, and Joyce.  This is a reading and discussion course. A number of short papers will be required.  The emphasis will be upon the visions of life embodied in these works and the formal designs by which these visions are communicated.

Ilja Wachs has been a member of the literature faculty at Sarah Lawrence College since 1965. From 1980-85, he served as the Dean of the College, and holds the Wachs Chair for Excellence in Teaching and Donning. He is the author of Dickens: The Orphan Condition (1999), and specializes in works of the 19th century, with an emphasis on the relation between the individual and the social world.

How to apply»


Introduction to Fiction Writing

July 7 – July 30, 2014
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
(once per week, class will be extended for conferencing)
3 credits
Tuition: $3,573

It's been said that the best fiction is marked by a "wild precision."  This class is aimed at helping your writing become both wilder and more precise. We’ll do writing exercises geared toward broadening your range and helping you think about writing in new ways. We'll talk about one another's work, in a spirit both constructive and respectful. And we'll read stories by 19th century masters such as Anton Chekhov and 20th century masters such as Aimee Bender and Junot Diaz.

How to apply»

How to Apply

To apply, please download an application, complete it, and return via mail, e-mail, or fax to:

The Center for Continuing Education & Special Programs
Sarah Lawrence College
1 Mead Way
Bronxville, NY 10708
Fax: (914) 395-2608
specialprograms@sarahlawrence.edu

If you have any questions or would like more information, please e-mail specialprograms@sarahlawrence.edu or call (914) 395-2205.